Friday, 8 May 2009

An Aristolean analysis of internet porn

Dear reader, our blog has moved to a new address.

Do come on over (and change your bookmarks accordingly): rationalist.org.uk

Here at New Humanist, we like to think we offer you a wide (some might say eclectic) range of journalism, criticism and commentary. It's for this reason that you can read the post below, which takes a series look at issues of integration and British identity, on the same page as the post you're currently reading.

Some weeks ago, during one of our editorial meetings, a senior member of our editorial team (who shall remain nameless), informed us that they had recently heard that a website called Pornhub had just been named (by experts, one imagines) the world's number one free porn site, which happened to coincide nicely with them learning about a new book which argues that pornography is popular art. All of which left us with one option really – to call our expert on classical tragedy, Michael Bywater, and allow him to offer an Aristolean analysis.

So click here to read The Art of Phwoar, but be warned, it may (does) contain a classical critique of explicit behaviour.

2 comments:

The Heresiarch said...

I find baroque opera offers a more exact parallel: stock characters, conventional situations, brief passages of recitative to hurry along the plot (which no-one cares about anyway) interspersed with interminable da capo arias designed to show off the performer's technique. No castratos in porn, of course, but the stars are equally freakish creations of the surgeon's knife.

Anonymous said...

My, how phallocentric this blog is today.