Friday, 4 April 2008

Tony Blair calls for more faith

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So, last night our former Prime Minister made a speech declaring the aims of his new Faith Foundation, the reasons he thinks religion can solve the world's problems, and why all the religions are capable of getting along by uniting around "common values".

You can read all about Tony's big moment in the Westminster Cathedral spotlight through these reports on the Guardian and Independent. It's also worth checking out the Times' political sketch: "This was an important speech for Mr Blair, really his coming out speech as a Christian. The politician who did not do God no longer exists. In his place is a man who does God and does God big."

What particularly struck me was one of the reasons Blair gave for why politicians might not want to publicly express their religious zeal – because people might think they are "somehow messianically trying to co-opt God to bestow a divine legitimacy on your politics."

So Tony's clearly saying that he didn't seek "divine legitimacy" for his major decisions. This from the man who told Michael Parkinson that God will judge him over Iraq.

2 comments:

dmk said...

"So Tony's clearly saying that he didn't seek "divine legitimacy" for his major decisions. This from the man who told Michael Parkinson that God will judge him over Iraq."

There is a difference - most Christians or Muslims believe that God will judge them, but that doesn't mean that everything they do has divine legitimacy. God will judge me for being grumpy with my kids when I should have been more patient, but that doesn't legitimise me being grumpy.

George said...

From the Guardian article:

"He went on to argue that religion could help to advance humanity and end global poverty. One of his foundation's aims is to bring people of faith together in pursuit of the UN's millennium development goals, which include the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger, promoting gender equality and combating diseases."

So, being the democratically elected leader of an influential European country with the ear of every progressive, liberal minded leader in the world wasn't enough - what he really needed all along was a faith based think tank!