Tuesday, 29 January 2008

The Pope's at it again...

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Benedict XVI seems to be on a mission to rile scientists at the moment, at least if his latest comments on the "seductive" powers of science are anything to go by.

Addressing a meeting of academics sponsored by the Paris Academy of Sciences and Pontifical Academy of Sciences, the Pope warned that “in an age when scientific developments attract and seduce with the possibilities they offer, it's more important than ever to educate our contemporaries' consciences so that science does not become the criteria for goodness.”

He added that research is required "into anthropology, philosophy and theology" in order to discover “man's own mystery, because no science can say who man is, where he comes from or where he is going”.

Apparently this is because "man is not the fruit of chance or a bundle of convergences, determinisms or physical and chemical reactions."

Perhaps someone ought to have a quiet word with him?

3 comments:

The Mad Patriot said...

Hey Ratzinger, in an age when altar boys attract and seduce with the possibilities they offer, it's more important than ever to educate your priests' consciences.

When you show some sign of having a clue what the hell you're talking about, maybe I'll listen.

RPiehowski42@yahoo.com said...

"No science can say who man is, where he comes from or where he is going”.

What a strange thing to say!
Yep, the guys losing his marbles!

I think that Science can say quite a bit on most of these things, expect maybe "where he is going", although even with that surely the rate of scientific progress in the future is extremely relevant to 'where we go'!

The better question though is why does the Pope think that religion has got anything useful to say on these issues?

Ex Patriate said...

what more can one expect from a man that heads an organization that has been perpetuating a myth for the past 2000 plus years